101 Bible Secrets
Bible Secret Number 6 

What Does God Eat for Breakfast?

Philosophically speaking, if you could answer one question about God in a satisfactory way, you would know more about God than all the philosophers and theologians who have ever lived. What question provides such sublime truth? It is this: "What does God eat for breakfast?"
 
Think about this for a moment. After a good night's sleep and after his shave and shower, what do you think God eats for breakfast? I am especially interested in whether he likes cream or sugar in his coffee (or whether he even likes coffee)? Or, you might consider what he prefers for lunch and supper (or if you are British) what does he enjoy at tea time? We could go a little further and ask what is God the Father's favorite food?

Now hold on, these are not silly or blasphemous questions! They are the most important you could ask and get answers to. The fact is, if you can answer any one of these to your complete satisfaction (where there would be no more questions that you would ever have to ask about the matter), you would learn more about God the Father than what all the preachers and priests have ever learned about him.

Let me give you a hint on how to answer these questions from a biblical point of view. In all the Bible when God is discussed, he is described anthropomorphically (that is a fancy word which means that God is described as looking just like a human being). And why shouldn't he? We are told in the first chapter of Genesis that humans are made in the image and likeness of God the Father (Genesis 1:26). But one can even get precise in depicting the Father's image. The author of the Book of Hebrews said that Jesus Christ is "the express image of his person" (Hebrews 1:3). Jesus is actually a duplicate in looks (an exact twin in appearance) to the Father. Even when on earth, Jesus said to his disciples: "I and my Father are one" (John 10:30). When Philip asked Jesus to show them the Father, he answered: "Have I been so long time with you, and yet have you not known me, Philip? He that has seen me HAS SEEN THE FATHER" (John 14:9). The apostle Paul also said that Christ "is the image of the invisible God" (Colossians 1:15).

Interestingly, since Christ Jesus has been resurrected from the dead and he now sits on the right hand of the Father in heaven as a divine person (Colossians 3:1), Christ is still called an anthropos [a human being]. That's right, Christ is still a human being though he is also a divine personage as is the Father. Paul said: "For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man [Greek: the anthropos] Christ Jesus" (I Timothy 2:5). Yes, though Jesus Christ is now a divine being, he is still called "a man" [an anthropos]. He looks just like a human, and in body form he is in the express image of the Father. Thus, both the Father and Christ Jesus now have the appearance of humans [they look like anthropos].

Now to our question about what God might eat for breakfast. I will give you a good hint to send you on your way of investigation. After Christ was resurrected from the dead and was now a divine being, he met his disciples at the Sea of Galilee. Christ put some fish on a charcoal fire and after it was cooked he took the fish with some bread and ate breakfast with his disciples. At least you can know one thing from this event: Divine personages do eat fish and bread! With this vital and essential hint in mind, for the next query in your quest to know more about God, you might try to find out if God now takes cream and sugar in his coffee? Now coffee was certainly known in the central areas of Africa (where it had its origin), but it probably was not known in Palestine in the time of Jesus. But today, coffee is known and used around the world. So what about this? Let me know your research on this matter because I am convinced God at the present does use cream and sugar in his coffee.


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